Questions:

 

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CAN I OVER-WIND MY CLOCK?

If you’re talking about winding mainsprings, no you can’t. If you just wound the clock fully and something goes wrong, it’s either just coincidence, a dirty, sticky mainspring, or a number of other possibilities, but you didn’t over-wind it. If the clock is weight-driven, it is possible on many of these clocks to raise the weights too high and for that to be your cause of trouble.

 



HOW DO I REGULATE MY CLOCK (MAKE IT KEEP CORRECT TIME)?

PENDULUM CLOCKS have a rating nut just below the pendulum disc. Turn the nut upward to speed the clock up, downward to slow it down. “Up speeds up, down slows down.” Remember that the nut is only a device for positioning the pendulum disc. It’s not the movement of the nut that makes the clock faster or slower. It’s the nut moving the disc itself up or down that affects the timekeeping rate. NON-PENDULUM CLOCKS have various things to turn or push to regulate them. There are too many different ones to discuss in a brief answer.

 

HOW OFTEN SHOULD MY CLOCK BE SERVICED?

It depends on the type and age of the clock and on how much time has passed since it was new or properly cleaned and overhauled. There is no single simple answer. Sometimes periodic service is advisable; sometimes “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” would be the answer. It’s easier to talk about modern clocks because many owners bought them recently enough to know about what year they were new.  The bigger the financial investment in the clock, the more it usually pays to have preventive maintenance done. For example, if you bought a new grandfather clock 2 or 3 years ago it would be beneficial to have a qualified person service the movement in your home. After that, having that done every 4 or 5 years is what I usually recommend.